Toward a high-wage, high-productivity service sector by Lester C. Thurow

Cover of: Toward a high-wage, high-productivity service sector | Lester C. Thurow

Published by Economic Policy Institute in Washington, D.C .

Written in English

Read online

Places:

  • United States.,
  • United States

Subjects:

  • Service industries workers -- United States.,
  • Service industries workers.,
  • Service industries -- United States -- Labor productivity.,
  • Service industries -- Labor productivity.

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references.

Book details

StatementLester Thurow. Background paper, Service sector wages, productivity, and job creation in the U.S. and other countries / Louise Waldstein.
ContributionsWaldstein, Louise.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHD8039.S452 U685 1989
The Physical Object
Pagination58 p. ;
Number of Pages58
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL2230290M
ISBN 100944826067
LC Control Number89083993

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Toward a High-Wage, High-Productivity Service Sector Service Sector Wages, Productivity and Job Creation in the U.S. and Other Countries.

by Lester C. Thurow and Louise Waldstein. This publication is available in PDF format. Purchase this publication. Get this from a library. Toward a high-wage, high-productivity service sector. [Lester C Thurow; Louise Waldstein].

Background Paper: Service Sector Wages, Productivity and Job Creation in the U.S. and Other Countries. Thurow, Lester; Waldstein, Louise This document contains two essays: "Toward a High-Wage, High-Productivity Service Sector" by Lester Thurow; and "Service Sector Wages, Productivity and Job Creation in the U.S.

and Other Countries" by Louise by: 3. Toward a High-wage, High Productivity Service Sector: Background Paper by Lester Carl Thurow avg rating — 0 ratings — published   During the s, 19 million additional jobs were created in this sector, while growth was stagnant in the goods-producing sector.

Here, Jack Triplett and Barry Bosworth analyze services sector productivity, demonstrating that fundamental changes have taken place in this sector of the U.S. by: The Minimum Wage and the Path toward a High-Wage Economy.

the uncovered sector consisted mostly of retail trade and service. high-productivity service sector book economy. Piore. After many years of slow growth, the U.S. economy has experienced a remarkable improvement in labor productivity that began in the mids but continued through the –02 recession and has now lasted for nearly a decade.

This book undertakes a detailed assessment of the resurgence of. Although the service sector’s size has grown in the past 20 years, its productivity growth has declined. Compare its productivity growth with that of the manufacturing sector, for example. Brookings Economic Papers.

Overview and Introduction. From tothe Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) estimates that U.S. non-farm multifactor productivity grew at. The Minimum Wage and the Path Towards a High Wage Economy. the uncovered sector consisted mostly of retail trade and service.

high-productivity/high-wage economy. Piore. Toward a High-Wage, High-Productivity Service Sector, Economic Policy Institute, Trend in Employment (). The South African services sector is large and growing.

This coupled with declining employment shares in manufacturing and mining (i.e. deindustrialization) suggests that South Africa is a de facto service-orientated economy.

Employment patterns in services reveal a segmentation that is characterized by high-productivity, high-wage services, low-productivity, low-wage services. Toward high-productivity services. By: is that our services sector is marked by a dichotomy of a large low-productivity segment based mostly in the informal sector, and a high-productivity service sector book segment (dominated by finance and real estate) with relatively narrow benefits.

Toward a high-wage, high-productivity service sector / Lester Thurow. Background paper, Service sector wages, productivity, and job creation in the U.S. and other countries /. Toward a High-Wage, High-Productivity Service Sector.

By Louise Waldstein and Lester Thurow Book. Load more Search for: Advanced search Policy choices have tilted the playing field toward the rich and corporations.

Here's how to tilt it back. Tax & Spending Explorer. Secondly, there has been significant employment growth in government services. Government services are, on average, characterized by relatively high-productivity activities, high skill intensity, and thus relatively high wage levels.

Toward a high-wage high wage levels are in part explained by strong public-sector unions. Downloadable. The South African services sector is large and growing. This coupled with declining employment shares in manufacturing and mining (i.e. deindustrialization) suggests that South Africa is a de facto service-orientated economy.

Employment patterns in services reveal a segmentation that is characterized by high-productivity, high-wage services, low. Consequently, the book calls for a shift toward policies that improve the quality of firm growth by supporting innovation, managerial skills, and firms’ ability to leverage global linkages and agglomeration.

This book is the third volume of the World Bank. Paper presented at the 9th World Congress of the International Economics Association, Athens.

SKOLKA, J. 'The Substitution of Self-Service Activities for Marketed Services', Review of Income and Wealth, 22, THUROW, L. and WALDSTEIN, B. Toward A High-Wage, High-Productivity Service Sector. This exercise is important to identify policy instruments in order to influence their trends at various levels to achieve the desired objective of guiding the economy towards a high-wage and high-productivity trajectory and to address socio-economic deprivation such as working poverty and earnings inequality.

He added: “If we want to move towards a high wage, high productivity economy, hospitality as it runs at the moment – which pays really rather low wages – is not obviously a sector that you. a high-wage economy, it has to be a high­ productivity one.

Annual productivity growth, which has been % in ,fell to % in And the growth of Cana­ dian manufacturing productivity has slowed relative to all other members of the Group of Seven rich countries. Cost competitiveness relative to the United States has declined.

JEROME A. MARK telephone communications, gasoline service stations, and air transportation, had very high growth rates from toranging from to more than percent per year in telephone communications when the business sector as a whole was experiencing a productivity growth rate of percent per year and the goods sector.

- the public sector tends to waste the public money, while the private sector aims to reduce costs; - in the public sector the employees are generally not redundant, that is why their need for labor is low.

Opinions AGAINST the private sector: the private sector is profit-driven, even if for many this means compromising the. The service sector is the third sector of the economy, after raw materials production and manufacturing. The service sector includes a wide variety of tangible and intangible services from office.

Although the service sector typically exhibits lower wage levels than the industrial sector (Squire, Table 15), so that the shift from agriculture into services rather than into manufacturing slows the growth in average urban income, public sector wages are generally high in developing countries (Squire, ~.

high-productivity, high-wage, (mostly traded, or tradable, or high value-added input provider) goods and service-producing sector. Political parties and government represent different class interests and therefore have different incentives to respond to needs in the low-productivity sector.

Policies towards this sector consequently reflect the. The main criticism generally aimed at the service economy is that it suffers from low productivity. This characteristic was for a long time (and indeed still is) regarded as intrinsic to services, so much so in fact that it provided Jean Fourastié () with the main criterion for the first positive definition of the service sector.

It also. 3Employment and Wages by Sector and Industry High-wage employment in was concentrated in seven of the 20 sectors (see Table 1), which accounted for 93 percent of the high-wage jobs. Only 40 percent of all jobs were in the same seven sectors.

In contrast, in five sectors, no industry paid an average wage at least Online Resources. ASQ: The Global Voice of Quality is a global community of people passionate about quality, who use the tools and their ideas and expertise to make our world work better.

The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) publishes International Standards which ensure that products and services are safe, reliable and of good quality. Employment patterns in services reveal a segmentation that is characterised by high-productivity, high-wage services, low-productivity, low-wage services, and government services.

There has been sustained growth in services exports in the post period but the composition is biased toward traditional services.

The expansion of the service sector is not simply due to the relatively low wages of many of its workers. Over the decades, capital has moved relentlessly into so-called service industries and even into the heart of social reproduction because there is a profit to be made from what have become necessities of contemporary life.

The secondary sector (manufacturing, construction, and mining) expanded to % of the work force by By the late s, however, the Japanese economy began to move away from heavy manufacturing toward a more service-oriented (tertiary sector) base.

the health sector is low because it is a service sector that has limited scope for efficiency improvements There has been a large push toward redefining the health sector.

The movement towards socialized medicine is strong but widely misunderstood. Many ordinary people see health care as a right and complain that it is too expensive.

Some economists also see problems with the existing health care system and propose public-sector alternatives.

One serious problem with those who want socialized medicine is that they fail to see the problems that. Thurow, L. no date: Towards a high-wage high-productivity service sector. Economic Policy Institute, Rhode Island Ave, NW, Washington, DC Google Scholar. “Jobs in the local service sector are the effect, not the cause, of economic growth.

(p) Attracting a scientist or a software engineer triggers a multiplier effect, increasing employment and salaries for those who provide local services. (p) The innovation sector has the largest multiplier of all the economic sectors: about three.

The High-Wage America project proposes an agenda that is three pronged: (1) a full commitment to public investment and industrial policy, (2) more aggressive and practical education and training programs, (3) and raised labor standards and social supports that have been purposefully neglected in recent decades.

Much of the growing wage inequality stems from increased inequality between firms rather than within firms, suggesting inequality is driven by changes in firm-level productivity related to new technology rather than to international trade or institutions.

Trade protectionism or re-energising unions may do relatively little to reverse the increase in inequality. However, over recent decades, job opportunities for these workers have shifted from unionized jobs in the industrial sector (high-wage, secure employment) toward non-unionized jobs in the service sector (low-wage, insecure employment).

Clearly, this has widened inequality, but the overall effect may be larger than realized. The last big region for fast-growing high-wage service jobs is Florida, led by 10th-ranked Orlando, 11th-place Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater and No. 14 Ft. Lauderdale-Pompano Beach-Deerfield Beach.

Better known for its huge hospitality industry, Florida cities like Orlando have become major lures to large companies seeking lower costs and taxes.“Increasingly, U.S. manufacturing is shifting to innovate here, produce there, eroding gains previously obtained from full-spectrum innovation,” the two wrote in their book.

“Manufacturing remains the largest job multiplier; its high productivity, high-wage jobs generate more secondary employment than do service jobs.”.Education levels (panel 5) are relatively low for the low-wage sector. Nearly two-thirds have a high school degree or less, compared with under one-half of the medium-wage group and about one-fifth of the high-wage group.

Virtually no high-wage workers have less than a .

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